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The third podcast of our spring season features one of the most influential United Methodists of the 1960s and 70s: Dr. Charles W. Keysor, founder of the Methodist renewal ministry known as Good News.

Dr. Charles W. Keysor

In a 1986 tribute, published several months after Dr. Keysor’s cancer-related death at age 60, Good News magazine described him as a “minister and journalist who almost single-handedly forged an influential evangelical movement within the United Methodist Church.”

Charles Winchester Keysor was born in Pittsburgh, Penn., in 1925 and was raised in Illinois. After receiving a journalism degree from Northwestern University, he married Margaret (Marge) Wickstrom, the daughter of a Swedish Methodist pastor, and began a career in journalism.

In the 1950s, he served as managing editor for The Kiwanis Magazine and later as managing editor of Together, the now-defunct official magazine of The Methodist Church.

Then, in 1959, he had a profound encounter with Christ at a Billy Graham crusade. Soon, he felt called to leave journalism and enter seminary.

By the mid-1960s, Charles Keysor — known to his colleagues and friends as Chuck — was serving as the pastor of Grace Methodist Church in Elgin, Ill. During a late-1965 lunch meeting with James Wall, then-editor of the Methodist ministers’ magazine, New Christian Advocate, Keysor shared his concerns about the prevailing liberal theology in the denomination, which he saw as a departure from the historic, orthodox Christian faith.

Wall invited him to write an article for the Advocate “describing the central beliefs and convictions” of the evangelical wing of Methodism. That article, “Methodism’s Silent Minority: A Voice For Orthodoxy,” was published in July 1966.

Within The Methodist Church in the United States is a silent minority group…. Its concepts are often abhorrent to Methodist officialdom at annual conference and national levels.

I speak of those Methodists who are variously called “evangelicals” or “conservatives” or “fundamentalists.” A more accurate description is “orthodox,” for these brethren hold a traditional understanding of the Christian faith….

Here lies the challenge: We who are orthodox must become the un-silent minority! Orthodoxy must shed its “poor cousin” inferiority complex and enter forthrightly into the current theological debate….

[W]e must be heard in Nashville, in Evanston, and on Riverside Drive. Most of all, we must be heard in thousands of pulpits, for the people called Methodist will not cease to hunger for the good news of Jesus Christ, incarnate, crucified, risen, and coming again.

“Methodism’s Silent Minority” sparked an overwhelmingly positive reaction from hundreds of Methodist pastors and leaders, several of whom asked why the church couldn’t have a publication that reflected an evangelical understanding of the Christian faith.

Months later, Keysor launched such a publication: Good News magazine. Bishop Gerald Kennedy (Los Angeles Area), the most well-known Methodist bishop of the time, wrote an article for the inaugural issue, which rolled off the press in March 1967.

In 2007’s 40th-anniversary issue of Good News, James Heidinger (who succeeded Keysor as editor) described how the new magazine led quickly to the formation of a full-fledged renewal ministry.

Seeing [an] immediate surge of interest in his magazine, Keysor chose 12 Methodists to serve as board members, and the Good News effort became incorporated as “A Forum for Scriptural Christianity.” The board’s first meeting was in May of 1967, only two months after the appearance of the first issue of the magazine.

Good News was a breath of fresh air for Methodists seeking spiritual renewal, quickly becoming their rallying point. Pastors and laity began organizing clusters of like-minded Methodists who came out of a felt need for fellowship, support, encouragement, and prayer. Soon, they began to map strategies for increasing evangelicalism within their annual conferences.

Good News' logo

In 1972, Dr. Dennis Kinlaw, president of Asbury College in Kentucky, asked Charles Keysor to join the Asbury faculty to teach journalism part-time, so the Good News ministry relocated from Elgin, Ill., to Wilmore, Ky., where it remains headquartered today, just a few blocks from Asbury College and Seminary.

In addition to leading Good News, editing Good News magazine, and teaching journalism at Asbury, Dr. Keysor wrote several books — including Our Methodist Heritage (David C. Cook, 1973), Living Unafraid (David C. Cook, 1975), and Come Clean! (Victor Books, 1976). He also edited What You Should Know about Homosexuality (Zondervan, 1979).

In 1982, weary from 16 years in the trenches of renewal ministry, he left the United Methodist Church to become a pastor in the Evangelical Covenant Church, a denomination founded by Swedish immigrants to the U.S.

Charles W. Keysor died at his home in Clearwater, Fla., on Oct. 22, 1985, two months after being diagnosed with advanced liver cancer.

The address on this podcast was recorded in August 1970 at the inaugural Good News Convocation, held in Dallas, Texas — an event attended by more than 1,500 pastors and leaders.

To listen, use the audio player below (22 min.) — or right click (Windows users) to download an mp3 (10.5MB).

For previous MethodistThinker Podcasts, click the “podcasts” tab at the top of this page. To subscribe via iTunes or other podcast software, use the “Subscribe to Podcasts” link at the top of the right column.


Related posts
Podcast: Dr. James Heidinger on ‘United Methodist Renewal’
A salute to James Heidinger of Good News
Podcast: Bishop Gerald Kennedy on ‘The Marks of a Methodist’

Related articles and information
Methodism’s silent minority: A voice for orthodoxy | Charles W. Keysor, New Christian Advocate (July 14, 1966 — via Good News)
United Methodism in crisis: Scriptural renewal through the Good News Movement | Chapter 4 of Public Pulpits: Methodists and Mainline Churches in the Moral Argument of Public Life by Steven M. Tipton (University of Chicago Press, 2008 — via Google Books)
Theological orientation and renewal in the United Methodist Church | Riley B. Case (via The Sundry Times) (March 15, 2011)
40 years of vision for United Methodist Renewal (PDF) | James V. Heidinger II, Good News (November/December 2007)
From the margin to the mainstream: United Methodism’s renewal movement (PDF) | Riley B. Case, Good News (November/December 2007)
Lessons from United Methodist renewal (PDF—see pp. 4-8) | An address by James V. Heidinger II to the Presbyterian Coalition Gathering (November 2005)
A charge to reclaim | W. James Antle III, The American Spectator (Oct. 5, 2005)
Leader of ‘Good News’ movement leaves Methodism | St. Petersburg Times (June 26, 1982) — via Google Newspapers archive
The story of Good News: A recollection by Charles W. Keysor (PDF) | Good News (March/April 1981)
Group shakes up Methodism | George Vecsey, New York Times News Service (April 1979) — via Google Newspapers archive
The Junaluska Affirmation: Scriptural Christianity for United Methodists (PDF) | Forum for Scriptural Christianity (Good News) (July 20, 1975)

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John Wesley, co-founder of the Methodist movement (along with his brother Charles), once wrote:

I am not afraid that the people called Methodists should ever cease to exist either in Europe or America. But I am afraid lest they should only exist as a dead sect, having the form of religion without the power.

And this undoubtedly will be the case unless they hold fast…the doctrine, spirit, and discipline with which they first set out. (Thoughts Upon Methodism, 1786)

Dr. Randy L. Maddox

This MethodistThinker Podcast, featuring an address by Dr. Randy L. Maddox, Professor of Theology and Wesleyan Studies at Duke Divinity School, focuses on what Wesley meant by those words.

Dr. Maddox explores Wesley’s reference to “doctrine, spirit, and discipline” by quoting from other writings of John Wesley and from several hymns by Charles Wesley.

An ordained elder in the Dakotas Conference of the United Methodist Church, Randy Maddox holds degrees from Northwest Nazarene College, Nazarene Theological Seminary, and Emory University. Before coming to Duke, Dr. Maddox was Paul T. Walls chair of Wesleyan Theology at Seattle Pacific University.

He is the author of Responsible Grace: John Wesley’s Practical Theology (1994) and the editor of Rethinking Wesley’s Theology for Contemporary Methodism (1998).

Dr. Maddox is also the co-editor of the recently released Cambridge Companion to John Wesley (2009), winner of the Wesleyan Theological Society’s 2010 Smith/Wynkoop Book Award.

The address on this podcast, edited for length, was presented at the 2008 conference of the Southeastern Jurisdiction of the UMC, held at Lake Junaluska, N.C.

To listen, use the audio player below (31 min.) — or right click (Windows users) to download an mp3 (14MB).

For previous MethodistThinker Podcasts, click the “podcasts” tab at the top of this page. To subscribe via iTunes or other podcast software, use the “Subscribe to Podcasts” link at the top of the right column.


Related information
The United Methodist Way: Living the Christian life in covenant with Christ and one another (PDF) | A paper developed by a group of UM scholars led by Randy Maddox (September 2007)
A missional future — the United Methodist Way | Taylor Burton-Edwards, UM Reporter (March 24, 2008)
Introduction to The Cambridge Companion to John Wesley (PDF) | Randy L. Maddox and Jason E. Vickers, Cambridge University Press (2009)
Be ye perfect? The evolution of John Wesley’s most contentious doctrine | Randy L. Maddox, Christian History (Jan. 1, 2001)
Papers by Dr. Randy L. Maddox (on Methodism, Wesley Studies, and Practical Theology) — scroll down and click “Publications” | Duke Divinity School

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The premiere podcast of our spring 2010 season features the leader who served for two decades as the bishop of the Los Angeles Area of The (United) Methodist Church: Bishop Gerald Kennedy.

Bishop Gerald Kennedy

Bishop Gerald Kennedy

Born in Michigan and raised in California, Gerald Hamilton Kennedy was schooled at the College of the Pacific, the Pacific School of Religion, and Hartford Theological Seminary.

In the 1930s and 40s, he served as a pastor and college instructor, leading churches in Connecticut, California and Nebraska, and teaching at the Pacific School of Religion and Nebraska Wesleyan University.

At the age of 40, in 1948, Gerald Kennedy was elected to the episcopacy and was assigned to the Portland, Oregon Area. Four years later, he was assigned to the Los Angeles Area (Southern California, Arizona, Hawaii) and continued in that post from 1952-1972.

In 1960, just before beginning a term as president of the Council of Bishops of The Methodist Church, Bishop Kennedy wrote The Marks of a Methodist (Methodist Evangelistic Materials), echoing themes from John Wesley’s classic work, The Character of a Methodist.

In the book, Bishop Kennedy noted that modern Methodists “have so minimized our history, our traditions, our doctrine, and our discipline, that to many of our church members, Methodism is only a convenience and a name.”

At a May 1960 laymen’s luncheon in Los Angeles, Bishop Kennedy delivered an address based on The Marks of a Methodist and focused on four defining marks of Methodist belief and practice:

  • Experience
  • Results
  • Discipline
  • Perfection

To listen, use the audio player below (23 min.) — or right click (Windows users) to download an mp3 (10.6MB).

Additional addresses and sermons by Bishop Kennedy are available in the UMC Audio Library.

For previous MethodistThinker Podcasts, and/or to subscribe via iTunes or other Podcast software, use the “Subscribe to Podcasts” link at the top of the right column.

Bishop Gerald Kennedy’s books include:

His Word Through Preaching (1947) I Believe (1958)
Have This Mind (1948) Readers Notebook, 2 (1959)
The Lion and the Lamb (1950) The Parables (1960)
With Singleness of Heart (1951) The Marks of a Methodist (1960)
Go Inquire of the Lord (1952) While I’m On My Feet (1963)
A Reader’s Notebook (1953) For Preachers and Other Sinners (1964)
Who Speaks for God? (1954) Fresh Every Morning (1966)
God’s Good News (1955) Seven Worlds of the Minister (1968)
The Christian and His America (1956) For Laymen and Other Martyrs (1969)
The Methodist Way of Life (1958) My Third Reader’s Notebook (1974)

Bishop Kennedy’s hymn, God of Love and God of Power, written in 1939, is hymn #578 in the United Methodist Hymnal.

An interesting historical footnote: Gerald Kennedy is the only United Methodist bishop to serve as both an active bishop and the pastor of a local church at the same time. In 1968, he appointed himself to the First United Methodist Church of Pasadena, California. The controversial appointment gave rise to a case that went to the UM Judicial Council.

Bishop Kennedy served as the pastor of First UMC-Pasadena until 1973. He died Feb. 17, 1980, at the age of 72.


Related information
Trumpets in the morning (a profile of Bishop Gerald Kennedy) | TIME magazine (April 11, 1960)
New president of Methodist Council of Bishops has a tough job | George W. Cornell, The Associated Press (April 23, 1960) — via Google News Archive
Text of the Episcopal Address at the 1964 General Conference (PDF) | Delivered by Bishop Gerald Kennedy (April 26, 1964)
At General Conference, Methodist take up thorny issue of racial integration | United Press International (April 27, 1964) — via Google News Archive
Methodists: The challenge of fortune | TIME magazine (May 8, 1964) — A painting of Bishop Kennedy was featured on the cover of this issue of TIME
Bishop takes pulpit (‘In an action without precedent In Methodism, Bishop Gerald Kennedy has decided to become a parish pastor’) | The Associated Press (Oct. 12, 1968) — via Google News Archive
Bishop Gerald Kennedy dead at 72 | Los Angeles Times/Washington Post News Service (Feb. 18, 1980) — via Google News Archive

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The final podcast of our fall season features prayer leader Terry Teykl, author of Acts 29, The Presence-Based Church, and Pray the Price: United Methodists United in Prayer.

Dr. Terry Teykl

Dr. Teykl, an elder in the Texas Annual Conference, is a “prayer evangelist,” traveling across the U.S. and around the world encouraging  churches to develop and maintain prayer ministries.

He also serves as chaplain for KSBJ radio in Houston, Texas. In that role, he developed the Houston area’s “Pray Down at High Noon” campaign.

Terry Teykl holds a Master of Theology from Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University. He earned his Doctor of Ministry with honors from Oral Roberts University.

This podcast features a sermon by Terry Teykl recorded in July 2009 at Sugar Land First United Methodist Church in Sugar Land, Texas. Listen using the audio player below (18:00) — or download an mp3 file (8.5 MB; on a PC, right click and choose “save as”).

For previous MethodistThinker Podcasts, and/or to subscribe via iTunes or other podcast software, use the “Subscribe to Podcasts” link at the top of the right column.


Related information
Excerpt from My Most Wanted Devotional: 40 Days to Pray for the Lost (PDF)
Biography of Terry Teykl (Microsoft Word file)
Website of Prayer Point Press and Renewal Ministries
Website of the World Methodist Prayer team
Books and resources by Terry Teykl | Prayer Point Press store
Why you should start a prayer room in your church | Terry Teykl, ForMinistry.com
30 Scripture-based prayers to pray for your pastor (PDF) | Terry Teykl, Church Prayer Leaders Network
Interview with Terry Teykl about the Houston area’s ‘Pray Down at High Noon’ prayer focus | KSBJ (several audio clips)
Brochure for upcoming ‘Prayerful Encounter’ led by Terry Teykl (PDF) — March 5-7, 2010 at Georgia’s Epworth by the Sea

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The current MethodistThinker Podcast features an address by the late Bishop William R. Cannon, a theologian and church historian who authored more than a dozen books, including History of Christianity in the Middle Ages, Theology of John Wesley, and Evangelism in a Contemporary Context.

Bishop William R. Cannon

William Ragsdale Cannon was born in Tennessee in 1916. He attended the University of Georgia, where he earned a B.A., and then went on to Yale Divinity School and Yale University, where he completed a Ph.D. in 1942.

He then joined the faculty of the Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta and spent the next 25 years teaching church history. From 1953-1968, he also served as Candler’s dean.

In 1968, William R. Cannon was elected to the United Methodist episcopacy, and over the next 16 years he served Annual Conferences in North Carolina, Virginia, and Georgia.

After retiring to North Georgia in 1984, he served as bishop-in-residence at Northside UMC in Atlanta. A decade after his 1984 retirement, Bishop Cannon became one of the principal founders of the Confessing Movement Within the United Methodist Church, calling on the UMC to “retrieve its classical doctrinal identity.”

Bishop Cannon died in 1997 at the age of 81. Emory University’s Cannon Chapel is named in his honor.

This address on this week’s podcast was delivered at the 1982 United Methodist Congress on Evangelism, meeting in Nashville, Tennessee.

To listen, use the audio player below (22 min.) — or right click (Windows users) to download an mp3 (10.5MB).

For previous MethodistThinker Podcasts, and/or to subscribe via iTunes or other Podcast software, use the “Subscribe to Podcasts” link at the top of the right column.


Related articles and information
Deaths: William R. Cannon, 81, Methodist Theologian | Wolfgang Saxon, New York Times (May 13, 1997)
William Ragsdale Cannon (1916-1997) | Frederick V. Mills Sr., The New Georgia Encyclopedia
Bishop Cannon’s library housed at Lake Junaluska | United Methodist News Service (July 31, 1998)
United Methodists form Confessing Movement | Christian Century (June 7, 1995)
Confessional statement of the Confessing Movement Within the United Methodist Church: ‘We Confess Jesus Christ The Son, The Savior, The Lord’ | The Confessing Movement (April 29, 1995)
Atlanta consultation forms steering committee for Confessing Movement within UMC | Good News magazine (July/August 1994)
The Cult of Sophia | Bishop William R. Cannon, Good News magazine (March/April 1994)
Episcopal Address at the 1984 General Conference held in Baltimore, Maryland (text—PDF) | Bishop William R. Cannon
Invocation at the Inauguration of James E. Carter as 39th president of the United States (text—PDF) | Bishop William R. Cannon (Jan. 20, 1977)

Related books
A Magnificent Obsession: The Autobiography of William Ragsdale Cannon (ordering info) | William R. Cannon, Abingdon (1999)
Turning Around the Mainline: How Renewal Movements Are Changing the Church (ordering info) | Thomas C. Oden, Baker Books (2006)

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The latest MethodistThinker Podcast features a sermon by Bishop James King, episcopal leader of the United Methodist Church’s South Georgia Conference.

Bishop James King in 2001

Before being elected to the episcopacy in 2000, James R. King, Jr. served as a pastor in Alabama, California, and Tennessee, and as a District Superintendent in the Tennessee Conference.

Prior to being assigned last year to South Georgia, Bishop King served for eight years as the leader of the Kentucky Annual Conference.

In August 2008, Bishop King was elected president of the General Commission on United Methodist Men.

Bishop James King blogs and posts photos at BishopKing.com.

This sermon on this week’s podcast was preached at the January 2001 Convocation for Pastors of African-American Churches held in Dallas, Texas — an event sponsored by the United Methodist General Board of Discipleship.

To listen, use the audio player below (21 min.) — or right click (Windows users) to download an mp3 (10MB).

For previous MethodistThinker Podcasts, click the Podcasts tab at the top of this page.

To subscribe via iTunes or other Podcast software, use this link to set up your feed: https://methodistthinker.com/category/podcasts/feed.


Related posts
A profile of Bishop James King
Bishop James King: ‘We are returning to God’

Related information
Bishop King celebrates first anniversary as episcopal leader in South Georgia | South Georgia Advocate (Sept. 14, 2009)
Bishop King to lead General Commission on United Methodist Men | United Methodist News Service (August 2008)
At Convocation for Pastors of African-American Churches, clergy focus on rekindling passion for ministry | United Methodist News Service (Jan. 18, 2001)

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This year marks the 60th anniversary of the Foundation for Evangelism, founded in 1949 by the featured speaker on this week’s MethodistThinker Podcast, Dr. Harry Denman.

Dr. Harry Denman

Dr. Harry Denman

As young man in the 1920s, Harry Denman showed exceptional gifts in evangelism and administration — both in his service at the First Methodist Church of Birmingham, Alabama, and as a lay leader in the North Alabama Conference.

When The Methodist Church was formed in 1939 (through the merger of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Methodist Protestant Church, and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South), Harry Denman was elected to lead the new denomination’s evangelism program.

A decade later, he launched the Foundation for Evangelism as a means of supporting the evangelism ministries of The Methodist Church. (Today, the Foundation’s work includes supporting professors of evangelism at United Methodist-related institutions, sponsoring the biennial Harry Denman Lectures at the UM Congress on Evangelism, and honoring outstanding efforts in local church evangelism through presentation of the Harry Denman Evangelism Award.)

Dr. Denman retired from the Foundation in 1965 but continued his ministry of lay preaching and personal witness. Billy Graham once said that he “never knew a man who encouraged more people in the field of evangelism than Harry Denman.”

Harry Denman’s “body” died (that is how he always described physical death) in 1976. He was 83.

This podcast features a sermon by Harry Denman that probably was recorded in the late 1960s. Listen using the audio player below (17:30) — or download an mp3 file (8.3 MB; on a PC, right click and choose “save as”).

For previous MethodistThinker Podcasts, click the Podcasts tab at the top of this page.

To subscribe via iTunes or other Podcast software, use this link to set up your feed: https://methodistthinker.com/category/podcasts/feed.


Related posts
Dr. Billy Abraham on United Methodism: ‘There is no common faith among us’ | Harry Denman Lecture at the 2009 Congress on Evangelism
Sir Alan Walker: ‘Christianity at the Crossroads’ | Harry Denman Lecture at the 1980 Congress on Evangelism

Related information
About the Foundation for Evangelism | Foundation for Evangelism
‘I Delight to Do Thy Will, O My God’ | A sermon by Harry Denman (audio), recorded at Lake Junaluska, N.C. (early 1960s) (posted on the Foundation for Evangelism web site)
‘Living and Believing’ | A sermon by Harry Denman (audio), recorded at Lake Junaluska, N.C. (August 1965) (posted on the Foundation for Evangelism web site)
‘A Lonely Place for Prayer’ | A sermon by Harry Denman (audio), recorded at Lake Junaluska, N.C. (August 1965) (posted on the Foundation for Evangelism web site)
Prophetic evangelist: Harry Denman | Ronnie G. Collins, ImageBearer’s Weblog (May 27, 2009)

Books about Harry Denman
Libraries that have Harry Denman: A Biography by Harold Rogers (Upper Room, 1977) | Where to buy a used copy
Libraries that have Prophetic Evangelist: The Living Legacy of Harry Denman (Upper Room, 1993) | Where to buy a used copy

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This week’s MethodistThinker Podcast features a presentation by Dr. James V. Heidinger II, recently retired as the president and publisher of Good News, United Methodism’s flagship renewal ministry.

Dr. James V. Heidinger

Dr. James V. Heidinger II

Born into a political family in Illinois (his grandfather was a three-term U.S. Congressman and his father a state officeholder), Jim Heidinger decided his calling was in Christian ministry. He attended Asbury College and Asbury Seminary in Kentucky, and then earned a Doctor of Ministry degree from Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C.

For 12 years, he served churches in the East Ohio Annual Conference, then was named the leader of Good News in 1981.

In that role, Dr. Heidinger held forth for nearly three decades as a calm and steady voice for United Methodist renewal, through his writings (in Good News magazine and in book form), speaking engagements, and as a media spokesman for evangelical concerns in the UMC.

Jim Heidinger retired from Good News on July 1, 2009, after 28 years of service.

This podcast features a presentation by Dr. James Heidinger recorded earlier this year at a gathering of the Arkansas Conference Confessing Movement. Listen using the audio player below (23 min.) — or download an mp3 file (10.7 MB; on a PC, right click and choose “save as”).

For previous podcasts, click the “Podcasts” tab at the top of this page.

To subscribe to the MethodistThinker Podcast via iTunes or other Podcast software, use this link to set up your feed: https://methodistthinker.com/category/podcasts/feed.


Related post
A salute to James Heidinger of Good News

Related articles and information
Methodism’s SILENT minority | Charles W. Keysor (July 1966)
Much has changed since Jim Heidinger became a leader of UM evangelicals | Terry Mattingly, Scripps Howard News Service (July 9, 2009)
Reflections on passing the torch (PDF) | James V. Heidinger II, Good News (May/June 2009)
Heidinger reflects on Good News leadership | Linda Bloom, United Methodist News Service (April 2, 2009)
Good News announces new leadership upon Heidinger retirement | Good News (March 12, 2009)
United Methodism in crisis: Scriptural renewal through the Good News Movement | Chapter 4 of Public Pulpits: Methodists and Mainline Churches in the Moral Argument of Public Life by Steven M. Tipton (University of Chicago Press, 2008 — via Google Books)
An address to the Faithful and Welcoming Churches national meeting (PDF) | James V. Heidinger II (July 2008)
40 years of vision for United Methodist reformation and renewal (PDF) | James V. Heidinger II, Good News (November/December 2007)
Lessons from United Methodist Renewal (PDF—see pp. 4-8) | An address by James V. Heidinger II to the Presbyterian Coalition Gathering (November 2005)
An interview with the Rev. Dr. James V. Heidinger II | Katherine T. Phan, The Christian Post (Nov. 6, 2004)
Turning the Mainline around | Michael S. Hamilton and Jennifer McKinney, Christianity Today (Aug. 1, 2003)
Good News board honors Heidinger | Tim Tanton, United Methodist News Service (Feb. 13, 2003)
Coalition speaker Heidinger describes renewal ‘phenomenon’ | Evan Silverstein, PCUSA News (May 27, 2003)
Good News’ response to Cal/Nevada’s dismissal of complaints against 68 clergy involved in same-sex covenant | James V. Heidinger II on behalf of the Good News Board of Directors (Feb. 14, 2000)
Good News board urges bishops to preserve unity of church | United Methodist News Service (Feb. 2, 1999)
Good News celebration emphasizes revival and renewal | United Methodist News Service (July 1, 1997)
‘Good News’ says push to accept homosexual practice threatens to split United Methodist Church | United Methodist News Service (May 6, 1997)
Evangelical leaders from mainline denominations form new association; Heidinger named chairman | United Methodist News Service (Oct. 24, 1996)
‘Re-Imagining’ rejects historic Christianity | James V. Heidinger II, Good News (January/February 1994)
Mainline conservatives protest women’s ‘Re-Imagining’ conference | Carlton Elliott Smith, Religious News Service (Jan. 15, 1994—reprinted in the Feb. 16, 1994 issue of The Christian Century)
‘Durham Declaration’ asks for ‘Scriptural approach’ to abortion | United Methodist News Service (March 12, 1991)

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The premiere podcast of our fall 2009 season features one of the most influential Methodists of the 20th century: the Rev. Dr. Sir Alan Walker.

Sir Alan Walker

Sir Alan Walker

Born in Sydney, Australia, in 1911, Alan Walker was the 13th person in his family tree to become a preacher. In the 1950s, he became known for leading evangelistic meetings across the Australian continent.

Later, he came the United States to work briefly with the Board of Evangelism of The Methodist Church (a predecessor denomination of The United Methodist Church).

Returning to Australia in the late 1950s, he became the superintendent of the Sydney’s famed Central Methodist Mission (now known as Wesley Mission), a post he held for 20 years. During that time, he founded Lifeline, an innovative telephone counseling ministry that continues today.

In 1978, Alan Walker became the first World Director of Evangelism for the World Methodist Council. In that position, he traveled to more than 75 countries to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ.

He was honored with knighthood in 1981. In 1986, he and his wife, Lady Winifred Walker, received the World Methodist Peace Award.

In his 70s, he founded what is now known as the Alan Walker College of Evangelism in Sydney.

The Rev. Dr. Sir Alan Walker died in January 2003 at the age of 91.

This podcast features a recording of Sir Alan Walker from the 1980 United Methodist Congress on Evangelism in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Listen using the audio player below (27 min.) — or download an mp3 file (12.3 MB; on a PC, right click and choose “save as”).

To listen to programs from our spring 2009 season, click the podcasts tab at the top of this page.

You can now subscribe to the MethodistThinker Podcast via iTunes or other Podcast software. Use this link to set up your feed: https://methodistthinker.com/category/podcasts/feed.


Related information
Honoring Sir Alan Walker | Gordon Moyes, successor to Alan Walker as superintendent of Wesley Mission (from an address originally presented in June 2001)
Theologian, leader, champion of the poor: Sir Alan Walker dies aged 91 | Wesley Mission news release (Jan. 30, 2003)
Sir Alan Walker, World Methodist evangelist, dies at 91 | Linda Bloom, United Methodist News Service (Jan. 30, 2003)
Remembering Sir Alan Walker | Sunday Nights radio program (transcript), Australian Broadcasting Corporation (Feb. 2, 2003)
A study in word and deed: A eulogy at Rev. Sir Alan Walker’s Thanksgiving Service | Harold Henderson, author, Reach for the World: The Alan Walker Story (Feb. 11, 2003)

Books by Alan Walker
Standing Up To Preach: The Art of Evangelical Preaching
Breakthrough: Rediscovery of the Holy Spirit
The Whole Gospel for the Whole World (The Wieand Lectures in Evangelism)
The Promise and the Power (The 1980 Harry Denman Lectures)

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This week’s MethodistThinker Podcast features a sermon by evangelist Tom Atkins, immediate past president of the National Association of United Methodist Evangelists.

The Rev. Tom Atkins

The Rev. Tom Atkins

After serving as a pastor in the North Georgia Conference for more than two decades, Tom became one of North Georgia’s General Evangelists in 1994.

Since that time, he has preached at revivals, camp meetings, and special services in nearly 30 of the UMC’s annual conferences.

Tom Atkins is also a member of the Francis Asbury Society, founded by former Asbury College president Dennis Kinlaw. The society is a group focused on “liv[ing] and proclaim[ing] the truth that complete Christian salvation involves not only forgiveness but also… transformation through the Holy Spirit’s power.”

The sermon on this week’s podcast, “We Need the Power of the Holy Spirit,” was preached in January 2009 at an evangelism rally sponsored by two districts of the North Georgia Conference.

To listen, use the audio player below (22 min.) — or download an mp3 (10MB).

This edition of the MethodistThinker Podcast concludes our current season. Lord willing, the podcast will resume in September.

Our projected fall line-up includes teaching by the late Bishop William R. Cannon; Robert Coleman, author of The Master Plan of Evangelism; Bishop Lindsey Davis of the Kentucky Conference; and the late Harry Denman.

For previous editions of the MethodistThinker Podcast, click the podcasts tab at the top of this page.


Related information
Biography of Tom Atkins | Indian Springs Holiness Camp Meeting
Brochure for Wild@Heart: Life-Changing Retreats for Men (PDF), sponsored by the Tom Atkins Evangelistic Association

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This week’s MethodistThinker Podcast features a sermon by Dr. Eddie Fox, world director of World Methodist Evangelism, a ministry of the World Methodist Council.

Dr. Fox is also the executive director of the World Methodist Evangelism Institute.

Dr. Eddie Fox

Dr. Eddie Fox

In his role as director of World Evangelism, he oversees the efforts of 16 regional evangelists worldwide. His efforts at linking Methodists through the “Connecting Congregations” program have resulted in 149 partnerships between established churches and newly formed congregations.

Eddie Fox’s books include Faith Sharing and Let the Redeemed of the Lord Say So, both written with Dr. George Morris.

The sermon on this week’s podcast was preached in February 2009 at Calvary UMC in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Fox’s text is 2 Corinthians 5:16-21.

To listen to the podcast, use the audio player below (17 min.) — or download an mp3 (7.9 MB).

Next week, as Pentecost Sunday nears, the MethodistThinker Podcast will present sermon titled, “The Power of the Holy Spirit,” by Methodist evangelist Tom Atkins of the North Georgia Conference.

For previous podcasts, click the podcasts tab at the top of this page.


Related post
Maxie Dunnam, Eddie Fox release videos on proposed amendments

Related articles and information
The worldwide Methodist movement | Eddie Fox, Interpreter Magazine (Web-only article—March 31, 2009)
Evangelism is ‘powerful dynamic’ for Methodist movement | Joan G. LaBarr, United Methodist News Service (July 2006)
Holding fast: Reflections for the 2008 General Conference (PDF) | H. Eddie Fox, We Confess newsletter (March/April 2008)

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